A Tablet with hardware QWERTY keyboard and USB port

A Tablet with hardware QWERTY keyboard and USB port 1No; no manufacturer has announced one yet. But do give it some thought – a 7-inch tablet with a hardware QWERTY keyboard would just make for some improved usability. In my opinion, it would move tablets closer to netbook functionality.

Yes; the display size will be reduced a bit, but that compromise won’t be bad. users would still have a large display combined with a tactile keyboard.

Then throw in a full USB port please, and we are good. Which of the manufacturers will make my day and get something like this into the market?

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

0 thoughts on “A Tablet with hardware QWERTY keyboard and USB port

  • May 25, 2011 at 12:44 pm
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    Was also wondering what it would take to make a power packed REAL mini netbook of, say, 7 inches display.

    Why not? Less power demand, better portability..

  • May 25, 2011 at 1:21 pm
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    In my opinion, this is a bad idea. Whats the point of having a big screen if I can’t use it?

    Most tablets inducing iPad, OVIM and INYE come with an optional protective casing that doubles as an external keyboard.

    Letting go of in built keyboards is what led to the birth of tablets, why would anyone want them back?

  • May 25, 2011 at 3:09 pm
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    ….Letting go of in builtkeyboards is what led to the birth of tablets,why would anyone want them back?….

    The idea is to have a REA COMPUTER that can transform to a tablet (by detaching the keyboard)

    we would want the keyboard back when we get back to a table and need a hardware keyboard for prodigious amount of text input..

    If we have bluetooth keyboards for all tablets (or they suport USB (-on-the-go) for keyboard attachment) – we may be close to HOME..

    (Now, what is the difference between conventional usb 2.0/3.0 and usb-ON-THE-GO on a tablet?).

  • May 25, 2011 at 4:15 pm
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    Roll back to 2007 and HTC Advantage and Shift come close those specs except for the CPU speed.

  • May 25, 2011 at 6:18 pm
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    Yomi, perhaps you miss the meaning of a tablet? A tablet by default does not come with a hardware keyboard! If it did it wouldn’t be called a tablet! Perhaps what you’re requesting for is a tablet optimised software in a netbook-like hardware casing?

    If a “tablet” comes in the form of a netbook then it will lose its sleeky and portability appeal to me. What’s a tablet? If I need a netbook I should just get one. Or better, at least, I should have the option of docking my tablet in a keyboard dock. Or use a wireless bluetooth dock with it. That is if I must use a hardware keyboard. Some of us are now adept at typing on a touch screen!

    If using a tablet one must have the inalienable option to use The tablet in the Tablet form factor. Having a keyboard along with it should be optional!

  • May 25, 2011 at 7:05 pm
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    Dear Sir Belfox and Afewgoodmen,

    A quick class on the subject of tablet form factor is in order.

    There is nothing in the definition or the history that excludes the presence of a physical keyboard. As EyeBeeKay has mentioned above, the tablet is premised on the idea of portable computing.

    Perhaps you are under the impression that the tablet was invented by Apple, and so suppose that the idea of a hardware keyboard is alien to the tablet form factor – a terrible presumption, I assure you.

    Those who have been around for a long time are familiar with the HTC Advantage and Shift that Brym mentioned above. They are also most likely to be familiar with the Nokia N810 internet tablet (released April 2008) which ran Maemo 4.1, and had a hardware QWERTY keyboard.

    Tablets can have hardware keyboards – those aide mobile computing – and some tablets have had them long before now.

    I hope that has cleared the air on the matter. Cheers.

  • May 25, 2011 at 7:10 pm
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    EyeBeeKay,

    USB-on-the-Go as implemented on mobile devices at present require an adapter for use. A full USB port would be the exact same port that you have on PCs, so you can plug your USB devices in directly.

    For example, I needed to copy some files from my E7 today but the supplied adapter was not on me. Well, for that period, it was as good as not having the functionality at all. Cheers.

  • May 26, 2011 at 8:07 pm
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    @Yomi I agree with you that Apple did not invent or start tablet computing. They only popularised it. Prior to the iPad, tablet computers were only niche devices. They were like specialised computers
    Used by professionals like architect, engineers, medics…

    That said and noted, however the dictionary definition of a tablet is; “…A Flat slab or surface…”

    Wikipedia defines it as “A tablet computer, or simply Tablet, is a complete mobile computer, larger than a mobile phone or Personal Digital Assistant, integrated into a flat touch screen surface…”

    The Catch word is “Flat Screen” “Slate” or “Tablet”. So if the hardware keys are integrated On the tablet or flat surface, it fits the description of a Tablet. 

    And by the way Windows and IBM Tablets have been in existence before Nokia N810 internet tablet or the HTC Adv. 

    Therefore a Smartphone OS put in a netbook that dual boots with windows is NOT a tablet. I think Acer has an Android netbook of sorts. That isn’t a Tablet computer!

    But if you mean that a hard-ware keyboard will be integrated on the slate/tablet as mentioned above like you have in a candybar QWERTY touch screen like the yet-to-be-released Nokia E6, then I’d agree it is indeed a
    Tablet. 

    What is clear is that the formfactor of a tablet is different from a netbook/laptop. Just like a DESKTOP computer has a different formfactor as when compared with a laptop.

  • May 26, 2011 at 9:44 pm
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    Afewgoodmen,

    I would have expected you to go do some more research on the subject before posting a response. I will not attempt to delve into too many details, but say again that you are mistaken as to what constitutes a tablet and what does not.

    Technically, there are different types of tablet. The specific type of tablet that Apple has made popular is the ‘Slate Tablet PC’. Other types exist, including those with swivel netbook-like keyboards, among others.

    Please go read up. It just helps to keep our readers from getting confused about these things. Cheers.

  • May 26, 2011 at 10:08 pm
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    Also, Afewgoodmen, just saying that

    What is clear is that the formfactor of a tablet is different from a netbook/laptop. Just like a DESKTOP computer has a different formfactor as when compared with a laptop

    is simplistic and terribly faulty.

    You picked a phrase out of context from Wikipedia to support your position, when the full information available there presents you with examples contrary to that position. Anyone else interested, please see: Tablet personal computer – Wikipedia

  • May 29, 2011 at 5:39 pm
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    @yomi why not try Asus they already have two tabs with physical keyboards. The “transformer” and “slider”. Where thr “transformer” ‘s keyboard can be detached. And about usb on the go. I guess android 3.1 promises that functionality

  • June 18, 2011 at 8:56 am
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    Tablets Tablets Tablets

    My Take
    Will love to see a tablet with standard USB and HDMI.

    This will solve alot of issues.
    When I want to do some real typing all I want to do is plug the keyboard.

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