Broken Windows: The collapse of Windows Phone is complete

Gartner’s latest statistics release has no good news for Windows Phone and its fans. Its Worldwide Smartphone Sales to End Users by Operating System in 1st quarter 2016 indicates that Windows Phone’s share of the global smartphone market has dropped to 0.7%. That is a 72% drop from last year. A case of broken windows, it is.

  • BlackBerry OS is even further down in the trench at 0.2%. With BlackBerry no longer making new BB OS devices, that share will plunge even further.
  • iOS’ share dropped too from about 17% last year to 14.8%
  • Android OS – the only platform that is growing right now – is at an all-time high of 84.1%
  • All the other platforms put together – Tizen, Sailfish, Firefox, Ubuntu, etc – all total another 0.2%. Apparently, Smartphones running Tizen OS aren’t selling as much as some people would like us to believe.

Broken Windows

How badly are the Windows broken? Not only has Windows Phone’s marketshare dropped to 0.7%, but a Mobility Arena poll indicates that 73% of users use them as backup devices, not as their primary smartphone. In other words, approximately only 0.5% of global smartphone users actually use a Windows Phone as their daily smartphone.

broken windows

I am a Windows Phone lover myself, but my Lumia 950 serves only as my office PC (via Continuum). I carry an Android smartphone as my daily driver now. Someone said to me yesterday, “Please ask the guys at windows phone to do something about data consumption. I’m on my 2nd windows phone and it’s been a nice experience. But I won’t be getting another one at this rate.”

My reply? “The guys at Windows Phone do not seem to listen to users. Everything we have asked for over the years have been ignored. I am done with them.” There are a hundred and one things that users have asked of Microsoft over the years. Microsoft has been hard of hearing.

Now with a global market share below 1%, I can say to myself that Windows on mobile is broken, shattered even. And that is such a shame.

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3 comments

  1. Well, from the word GO, this Windows had cracks. It never ever got MOBILE traction.

    You can’t win ’em all the time, and I am sure Satya Nadella realizes that it may be time to go into Driverless Vehicles production or something radiator different from IT. Their dominance in IT keeps whittling down., with Google likely to eventually take over the desktop space when a seamless synergy between the Android platform and desktop (through ChromeOS) happens.

    My money is on Google.

    What Microsoft couldn’t achieve with Continuum, Google probably willl, when a convergence of ChromeOS and Android happens.. Android has the world, and that’s a powerful leverage, the reverse of the Microsoft Continuum discontinuity.

    A quote:

    The Play Store on Chrome OS would open Google Play apps to a new form factor (horrible Android laptops notwithstanding), but it could also be the tip of the iceberg. Remember, App Runtime for Chrome (ARC) is just a Chrome extension, so it works everywhere desktop Chrome works. If the full Google Play Store comes to ARC, it would be possible for it to work on not just Chrome OS, but also Chrome’s other host desktop operating systems: Windows, OS X, and Linux.

    We could be looking at a trojan horse. What if Chrome OS is just the test platform, with a plan to eventually unleash Google Play on every other desktop platform in the future? Every computing device today is part of an ecosystem play, so what if Google’s ecosystem could do battle with Apple and Microsoft on their own platforms?

    Lobatan!

  2. I never liked windows phone thanks to the annoying gui, well like I said before, Windows phone is going the way of zune, very unfortunate. With the way android is expanding, I for see it taking over windows pc

  3. Funny enough, the demise of Zune at the hands of Microsoft is a reminder of what is currently happening with Windows Phone (even the name change to Windows 10 Mobile doesn’t do it for me). Actually it started with Windows Mobile which preceded Zune. I still have my Windows Mobile device and used to work with an IT guy who kept his first Windows Mobile device. He said it had capabilities that current ones don’t have (can’t quite remember the list).

    Just as Google used to be in the habit of killing off services they felt were no longer useful to them, Microsoft has done the same over the years – must be an American thing. And from the time they decided to take over from Nokia with the Lumia range, they basically killed it almost immediately. Poor roll out of the updated OS, delay after delay of new phone releases, conflicting information as to whether devices would be released at all.

    If I can get my hands on a Lumia 950 I will definitely use it, but it’s sad to see Windows Phone die such an undignified death from neglect.

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