Fast and Furious wins the race

Fast and Furious wins the race 1

Apologies to parents and culture (and to whoever wrote Aesop’s Fables), but we were fed some serious crap while growing up. That story about the race between the tortoise and the hare was one of the most stupid stories ever told – all in a bid to teach children morals.

One, nobody ever runs a race like that.

Two, if at all there was a moral to that story, it would be one warning against looking down on your competition so badly that you get cocky and stupid, not one to teach patience or whatever it is that “slow and steady” is supposed to represent.

I ran into a tweet that sums up the stupidity of that “fabu”. It said (I’m typing on WordPress app for mobile here, so I cannot embed):

Slow and steady wins the race ¹

¹ Applies only in situations where opponent defies all logic and takes a nap during the event.

True. That story defies all logic. Who stops to take a nap during a race? Even a long distance race? I ran cross-country all through secondary school. I believe the distance was 29 kilometres. In six years, I never stopped to take a nap once.

I hope that no-one today still tells that story to their children as a way of teaching patience. I suspect that today’s kids are wiser anyway and will ask you some tough questions if you do. Slow and steady has never won any race. Speed wins races. Make your kids watch Fast & Furious instead. They will learn better how to win.””

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

0 thoughts on “Fast and Furious wins the race

  • March 5, 2014 at 8:15 am
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    You are the man, Mr Mo.. !

    Yes, lots of platitudes can not really stand rigorous analysis. They may sound SOUND, but they are often pure baloney

    It’s like saying, the patient hyena eats the juiciest meat. Oh, yeah? More likely, it will pick the remaining bones!

    And, how come, supposedly momentous statements are often grammatically decrepit?

    Slow and steady WIN the race

    .. Not…

    Slow and steady WINs the race

    #English 101

  • March 5, 2014 at 8:54 am
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    Remember the ones about talking snakes and dead people coming back to life?

  • March 5, 2014 at 11:37 am
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    It depends on the way u choose to analyse these “fabus”
    A fabu that teaches patience cnt be soo wrong. For example everyone is out for get rich quick businesses.bt the truth is u need to be patient and consistent(slow and steady) for ur business to grow and expand.
    Maybe new stories r in order though.

  • March 5, 2014 at 11:59 am
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    be the truth is u need to be patient and consistent(slow and steady) for ur business to grow and expand.

    I don’t think Consistency has anything to do with being Slow, or being fast..

    You can be (in) consistent while being fast. Or, slow.

    If you can achieve your goals faster, it appears that’s a whole lot better than being slow.

    Conclusively snail pace , at anything, is not necessarily synonymous with consistency.

    And speed, with other positive attributes, dovetails to consistent winning over slower pace, with similar positive attitudes… in all facets…

  • March 5, 2014 at 7:59 pm
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    While telling children that “Fast and furious” wins the race also tells them is causes untold deaths, attracts the unwanted attention of the authorities and costs a lot of money to maintain.

    But hey if they don’t mind the adrenaline rush and nasty accidents, go ahead.

  • March 6, 2014 at 8:38 am
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    We learn new stuffs every day o, a quick check in my dictionary reveals fables and fabu means the same in context.

    It led me thinking if there are more words from the list of awon Yoruba coinages to badt gaan. I guess buredi (bread), mangoro (mango), bota (butter) would count too.

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