Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

27 thoughts on “Guide to Mobile Internet in Nigeria – Revised Edition

  • February 26, 2010 at 7:09 am
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    Hmm, this should be interesting. Am downloading mine now.

  • February 26, 2010 at 6:15 pm
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    @admin
    Thanks for the guide.
    I’ve just finished downloading yet to open and read it.
    More grease to your elbows.

  • February 26, 2010 at 11:01 pm
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    Downloaded the first version sometime and thought it was good piece of work. I expect this to be better.

    I wish we can have a bi-monthly rating of mobile internet service in Nigeria to guide people who want to sign up, change connections and keep this mobile companies on their toes. I hope MobilityNigeria provides this service in the near future – a sort of rating agency – with all the business benefits that comes with it. Why MobilityNigeria? I think your dedication to this industry makes you better placed than most. I hope you consider this. Well done.

  • February 27, 2010 at 12:31 pm
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    Thanks, all, especially for the vote of confidence.

    Archie, we’ll take your suggestions into mind in drawing up our plans. Its a lot of work, but who says it cannot be done?

  • February 27, 2010 at 8:29 pm
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    I think it’s very obvious that I’m the only one having problems downloading this. The download speed of this particular file is killing me and it has no resume function. This would be like the 10th time, I ‘m trying to download it without success.

    Do you have it hosted elsewhere? PLEEEEEEASE!

  • February 28, 2010 at 3:04 am
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    Chukwudi,

    Unfortunately, we don’t have it uploaded elsewhere. Perhaps you could re-try during off-peak hours?

  • February 28, 2010 at 6:49 am
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    Thanks for the suggestion. It’s 6am and I just tried again and it downloaded flawlessly. Yeye me had forgotten that browsing was easy breezy after 4am. lol.

    Thanks.

  • February 28, 2010 at 11:14 am
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    @deoladoctor. I didn’t bother downloading it. I just collected a copy of Deoladoctor’s.

    I should say the PDF guide is superb. Kudos to the Mobility Nigeria team. More of this and very very soon we should overtake PCWORLD in Tech News and Product guides! What is so great about all this is that it is “Made in Nigeria”!

  • February 28, 2010 at 5:09 pm
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    nice and comprehensive. keep it up.

    just want to add that glo 24hr only is 100MB data cap not 50MB as indicated in the ebook

  • February 28, 2010 at 5:12 pm
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    Hello bily,

    Thanks. When did Glo change this? We still have the documents given to us, plus we used it a couple of times then and confirmed it to be 50mb. The originally announced cap was 50mb.

  • February 28, 2010 at 5:34 pm
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    Afewgoodmen, thanks for the compliments :blushing:

  • February 28, 2010 at 5:38 pm
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    honestly i had always believed it was a 50mb cap, infact i had been miserly with my browsing based on the 50mb cap. funny i just check their website and its 50mb that is there.

    but if you try browsing on the gloflat apn on your phone without subscribing, 127 will send you a link (3gprepaid self help portal). on that page you will find a description of their offers on glo3g prepaid and its 100Mb thats there. note the link only works with gloflat apn.

    i have used it a couple of times and its 100mb data cap. i always register through the selfhelp portal though.

  • February 28, 2010 at 10:11 pm
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    It just occured to me that Mobility Nigeria left out the cdma carriers when preparing this brochure.

    Is it an oversight or a deliberate act? Or were they left out because their services are mostly modem based rather than “in-phone” browsing? If this is the case, then i can safely say that their definition of mobile internet is: “internet connections by mobile phones only”.

    I submit that cdma carriers are a force to reckon with when it comes to mobile internet considering the fact that they have one of the best internet tariff plans. (Starcomms internet tariff plans for example)

  • February 28, 2010 at 10:14 pm
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    @bily

    100 MB limit? thats new. knowing Glo very well, i am suprised that this information is not given wide publicity as they are akin to even for infrastructure and services that are not up and runnin. Anyway, the Guide is a nice one

  • March 2, 2010 at 11:31 pm
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    What is going on?

    Mobility Nigeria are keeping a dignified silence and everyone is towing the same line. No one seem to think my question about not including the cdma carriers in the brochure is worth answering. If you are living in the same part of nigeria like me where gsm networks have no 3g and their gprs performance is rated as poor, you will see the relevance in my question. Majority here use the cdma networks principally for mobile and desktop based internet while keeping the GSM for calls and occasional internet.

    I don’t know the trend in lagos but i am certain that my situation is mirrored in many parts of Nigeria outside the big cities. Why is mobility nigeria leaving out the cdma networks?

  • March 2, 2010 at 11:45 pm
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    deoladoctor,

    🙂 No; we were not keeping a dignified silence. There is only so much we can keep track of, especially when duty calls. Sometimes, we are unable to immediately respond to a comment because we have to attend to customers at our place of employment where we actually earn our living. Then we forget to return to that comment later, and the rest is history…

    In answer to your question, yes; it is a deliberate omission. CDMA networks currently do not provide a true mobile internet experience. By “mobile” here, we mean on-device. At best, they offer one or two high-end smartphones that can do that, but that does not address the market we are looking at. It is only on GSM networks that anyone can buy a N15,000-N20,000 handset and be browsing and checking mails on the device within 10 minutes – or at all.

    The CDMA guys have been lazy with opening up their services. If they want better coverage in the mobile community, they must open up. Their closed business is partly what led to the GSM guys taking the market from them in the first place.

    By the way, you said:

    If you are living in the same part of nigeria like me where gsm networks have no 3g and their gprs performance is rated as poor, you will see the relevance in my question.

    Actually, GSM networks generally have better coverage and service than their CDMA competitors in most locations across the nation. You will find GPRS service available in many of those small towns and communities scattered around the country, and CDMA nowhere to be found.

    Plus, GPRS delivers a better browsing experience (on-device or off-device) than CDMA on an average day – at least here in Nigeria. This is from feedback that we have received over the years.

  • March 3, 2010 at 12:36 am
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    @admin

    Thanks for your answer. I will not flog the issue but just to point out a thing, you said:

    “……GPRS delivers a better browsing experience (on-device or off-device) than CDMA on an average day – at least here in Nigeria. This is from feedback that we have received over the years.”

    Well, sorry to differ, this is just the opposite of what i get here since i started browsing on motorola Q with starcomms. Whenever there is network, starcomms 1x browses flawlessly as opposed to MTN that coughs and sputters (and MTN is the gsm king here in sapele). Also, using my starcomms modem is a breeze while MTN modem (and phone as modem) give interrupted services at best.

    Maybe my experience is one in a million and i am the odd man out.

  • March 3, 2010 at 5:35 am
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    deoladoc,

    My contribution to the question you asked. you said:

    It just occured to me that you guys left out the cdma carriers when preparing this brochure.

    Is it an oversight or a deliberate act? Or were they left out because their services are mostly modem based rather than “in-phone” browsing? If this is the case, then i can safely say that their definition of mobile internet is: “internet connections by mobile phones only”.

    Mobility Nigeria are not the only one who define “mobile internet” and “mobile web” like that. That seems to be the industry’s generally accepted definition.

    For example, read through Opera’s state of the mobile web report, and that’s the same yardstick. Not long ago. When Nokia recently spoke of the majority of the world’s internet users accessing it via phones, it was the same yardstick – use of internet on the phone.

    I don’t think Mobility Nigeria are out of line. I know we sometimes loosely include tethering as mobile internet, but strictly speaking it isn’t.

    just my two cents.

  • March 3, 2010 at 7:09 am
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    BREAKING NEWS? GLO always MAX now 5GB, GLO always MIN now 1.5GB, always Day 150MB, G300 now 4GB. NOT TOO BAD.

  • March 3, 2010 at 9:59 am
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    @dayann

    Thanks.

    @timmy lawal

    Nice plan. Would have been better still if they can manage to improve their services. I’ve not been able to browse on glo in the past 2 days.

    Why must gsm carriers always limit us with Mb or Gb caps.

    @admin

    Thanks for taking time off your real source of income to cater for us & answer our sometimes irritating questions. By the way, are you really nigerians?

  • March 3, 2010 at 11:43 am
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    @timmy, thanks for the tip-off!

    @deoladoctor: thanks for the compliments. We keep trying. Yes; we are really Nigerians 🙂 – for now our in-house team is made up of: Dayo, Yomi, and Omonzua

  • March 3, 2010 at 9:31 pm
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    We all can now see the effect of Glo-1. Is too much to ask for even more bandwidth in the future? LMAO.

  • March 4, 2010 at 7:11 am
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    may God grant you the strenght. It is well with you

  • January 9, 2011 at 7:55 pm
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    With effect from January 2011, our Guide to Mobile Internet in Nigeria is now integrated into our quarterly magazine, mobileRave. Subscribe today!

Comments are closed.

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