Here is an example of how to use others’ content on your site

I keep advocating for the respect of copyright. There are a lot of people out there feeding off the labours of others by lifting content without due observance. A site recently used part of our content here at Mobility by publishing an excerpt and then including a link back to the original article here. Splendid. There is no law against that.

How to use others content

Here is the link to the site.

Follow these two key rules and you are fine:

1. Where a writer/website/blog has not given permission upfront, it is okay to quote a paragraph or two of their work, with proper credit (in offline works) or a link back to the original article or story (in online works). It is wrong to reproduce the article or story in its entirety without permission. Don’t.

2. Where you would love to reproduce an article or story in its entirety, the correct thing to do is to contact the writer for permission. If he grants permission, usually, it will be on certain terms and conditions. Those terms and conditions may or may not include a fee to use their works. You are bound by law to stick to whatever those terms and conditions are, if you choose to proceed, otherwise you will be in violation of copyright. It is NEVER right to reproduce a writer’s work in entirety without prior express permission being given.

We can do better.

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

0 thoughts on “Here is an example of how to use others’ content on your site

  • January 17, 2014 at 6:13 am
    Permalink

    In my little experience in life, people will almost always do whatever is convenient for them, like plagiarizing, if there are no repercussions.

    The online world being no man’s land, getting people to tow the correct line is tough, because the legal framework for online crimes is shaky, and difficult, if not sometimes impossible, to enforce, cross border.

    If I am in Ghana, say, and plagiarize your work, what can you, the Owner of the Work, do about it, practically, except rant and rave?

    Perhaps sermonizing, pontifications and evangelization, and appeal to conscience are the next best recourse?

    These articles could be of pertinence here..

    http://mason.gmu.edu/~montecin/copyright-internet.htm

    http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/18074/cybercrime-knows-no-borders-/

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