Nokia N900 – Getting Acquainted

No; this is not the review yet – a top-specified device like the N900 cannot be objectively reviewed under 24 hours or even a week. It has to be thoroughly used, so you’ll all have to be patient about that review.

But while waiting, we have titbits for you to digest, and some of these info will help portray the N900 accurately when the review is published.

First off, here’s what is in the Box:

  • Nokia N900
  • Nokia Battery (BL-5J)
  • Nokia High Efficiency Charger (AC-10)
  • Nokia Stereo Headset (WH-205)
  • Video out cable (CA-75U)
  • Nokia charger adaptor (CA-146C)
  • Cleaning cloth

Nokia N900 - Getting Acquainted 1

And here is the long list of specifications

  • Dimensions: 110.9 × 59.8 × 18 (19.55 at thickest part) mm
  • Weight: 181g
  • OS: Maemo 5 software on Linux
  • 3.5 inch touch-sensitive widescreen display; 800 × 480 pixel resolution
  • 3.5mm AV connector
  • Nokia N900 - Getting Acquainted 2TV out (PAL/NTSC) with Nokia Video Connectivity Cable
  • Micro-USB connector, High-Speed USB 2.0
  • Bluetooth v2.1 including support for stereo headsets
  • Integrated FM transmitter
  • Integrated GPS with A-GPS
  • BL-5J 1320mAh
  • TI OMAP 3430: ARM Cortex-A8 600 MHz, PowerVR SGX with OpenGL ES 2.0 support
  • Up to 1GB of application memory (256 MB RAM – almost 150 MB available after booting, plus 768 MB virtual memory)
  • 32 GB internal storage (Store up to 7000 MP3 songs or 40 hours of high-quality video)
  • Up to 16 GB of additional storage with an external microSD card
  • Full QWERTY tactile keyboard
  • Full QWERTY onscreen keyboard
  • MicroB browser with Adobe Flash™ 9.4 support
  • MP4 Video recording at up to 848 × 480 pixels (WVGA) and up to 25frames per sec
  • Video playback file formats: .mp4, .avi, .wmv, .3gp; codecs: H.264, MPEG-4, Xvid, WMV, H.263
  • 5 megapixel camera (2584 × 1938 pixels); 3 × digital zoom; Dual LED flashCMOS sensor, Carl Zeiss optics, Tessar lens
  • Photo editor on device
  • Integrated GPS, Assisted-GPS, and Cell-based receivers
  • Documents viewer (upgradable to full editing suite)
  • Ovi Maps application
Also read:  The Infinix Hot X507 Review: "La Classique" Budget Phone

That is a very long specifications sheet, but the question is, Does the N900 deliver? While drooling over the specs and the hardware, it occured to us that we were not going to find out if we didn’t power on the phone; would we? So, we reached for the power button after slotting in a SIM card.

Power On and Firmware Update
A few minutes after powering on the phone, a system update notification balloon indicated that a frirmware update was available for the device. A quick check showed that the firmware on the device was version 2.2009.51-1.002.
Nokia N900 - Getting Acquainted 3

The system notification further indicated that the size of the update was 16.2mb. The device also automatically checks for updates of installed applications and notifies the user the same way.

Nokia N900 - Getting Acquainted 4
Everything was done Over-the-Air. No PC. No cables. No hitches. After the update was completed, the “About Device” info showed that the new firmware was version 3.2010.02-8.002.

So, there we were with the latest firmware on our N900 and we were ready to go!

Nokia N900 - Getting Acquainted 5

Tomorrow, we will upload a video of how well the TV-out functionality works on the N900. Why TV-out first? Well, its an apt way to show you the user interface of the device – all on a big screen. You don’t want to miss it.

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

13 thoughts on “Nokia N900 – Getting Acquainted

  • April 22, 2010 at 10:32 am
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    Why does a SWEET soup have to be so ‘damaging’ to the pocket.? Sigh!

  • April 22, 2010 at 11:56 am
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    The specifications looks really impressive…..cant wait for the review proper

  • April 23, 2010 at 3:09 pm
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    Tomorrow, we will upload a video of how well the TV-out functionality works on the N900. Why TV-out first? Well, its an apt way to show you the user interface of the device – all on a big screen. You don’t want to miss it.

    Sorry guys, but the video came out bad. The TV-out feature worked well and presented the UI of the N900, but the camcorder we have on ground isn’t so good.

    After conversion of the recording to MP4 (and some attempts to enhance it), the quality was still not so good. This was one situation we wished we still had the Samsung Jet. The video recording would have been superb. 🙁

    But one cannot eat his cake and have it.

    Anyway, we also watched a couple of trailers and a full blown movie on TV via TV-out. No flaws. TV-out on the N900 just works.

  • April 24, 2010 at 2:10 pm
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    the maemo linux os is great on mobile no doubt. what nokia needs now is serious work on its designs. otherwise it will keeping loosing market share in the smartphone segment. the strategy of cutting phone prices is not enough. the Iphone is just one phone, but the sales from this phone contributes more than 50% of apple’s profit. nokia’s engineers should wake up!

  • April 26, 2010 at 6:27 pm
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    Did I read that “up to 1 gigabyte Up to 1GB” of application memory (256 MB RAM, 768 MB virtual memory). My 8 Gigabyte iphone at Last count has 1.35 Gigabyte of different applications installed in it. That is a bad sign for a restriction in the amount of application the N900 can take.

    Then let’s look at the RAM/CPU; TI OMAP 3430: ARM Cortex-A8 600 MHz, PowerVR SGX with OpenGL ES 2.0 support; My Question goes; Why should Nokia be stingy with Memory and CPU speed in their top end and fabulously expensive top of the line smart phone? This really beats me. You see HTC with their snapdragon CPU with 1 gigahertz clock speed. You also find their top end phones with 512 of RAM.

    I believe Nokia should do better to justify the price of the phone!

  • April 26, 2010 at 6:32 pm
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    I can’t wait to see the review. Despite all, I think the interface and multi media aspects of the N900 should be awe inspiring!

  • April 26, 2010 at 8:47 pm
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    Afewgoodmen,

    A little correction is in order here. You are mixing up “application memory” with memory for installable applications. My N900 currently has 1.69 Gb of available memory for installation of applications. I already have 15 MB of apps installed.

    Application memory has to do with running applications, not installing them

    The N900 is quite fine. Comparing its specs with say the iPhone 3GS, the differences are minimal and in terms of CPU they are similarly-specified. Plus, it beats the 3GS in other areas too.

    If you want a top-end smartphone that Nokia messed up right from the word Go, take a look at the Nokia N97. That’s 128MB RAM (55MB after bootup!!) and 434 MHz processor. Take that.

    Why would I want to pay good cash for that?

  • April 27, 2010 at 6:00 pm
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    It is much better to compare the Nokia N900 with the new brand of HTC phones with the 1GHz Snap dragon processors! Pricewise, they fall in the same range. THe iphone 3gs is getting outdated. Perhaps, it may not be entirely right to compare with the N900 which is perhaps a relatively newer phone. We are expecting another iphone by June. And probably from analysis it would house a 1 GHz processor too!

  • April 27, 2010 at 7:45 pm
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    It is much better to compare the Nokia N900 with the new brand of HTC phones with the 1GHz Snap dragon processors! Pricewise, they fall in the same range.

    While the N97’s price has dropped over the months, it isn’t right to attempt to portray it as not being a top-end model. It is, and Nokia pronounces it as their flagship device. Whatever the price difference, it is insulting for Nokia to produce a flagship device with such constraints.

    Let’s get back to what this is about – your claim that Nokia was stingy with the N900. I have already shown that you were wrong about the memory issues.

    Also, if Nokia was stingy with the N900, Apple was even more stingy with the iPhone, though I doubt you will concede that. But here is a quick comparison of prices:

    iPhone 3GS 32GB – N145, 000 versus Nokia N900 – N93, 000

    For that price, the iPhone 3GS lacks several features (e.g. full QWERTY keyboard, multi-tasking, Stereo FM, FM Transmitter, MicroSD slot, Video call camera, Infra-red) that the N900 takes for granted, plus poorer specs in others e.g. camera, Bluetooth with headset support only.

    Also, here is a list of 1GHz devices:

    HTC HD2 – N115,000
    Nexus One – N105, 000
    Sony Ericsson X10 – Price unknown at this time

    And the N900 is clearly the least expensive of the lot. The N900 clearly is the best value for money (price-to-features ratio) of the lot. It doesn’t skimp on anything, if we look at the prevailing prices, and even delivers more value in certain ways.

    Incidentally, the “dated” and much lower-featured iPhone 3GS (released in June 2009) is actually far more expensive than the more recent cutting-edge line-up of 1GHz devices.

    I have been a critic of Nokia’s stinginess with some of its high-end devices, but to say that Nokia was stingy with the N900 is far from the truth.

    But I leave you and other readers to draw your own conclusions from the above facts.

  • April 27, 2010 at 8:30 pm
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    Great work with the details and your facts. I have to commend you of that. But if you compare the 16Gb model of the iphone with the N900, then perhaps you’d see that the price ratio will tilt in favour of the iphone.

    And secondly, I have never been a fan of QWERTY keyboard. It is bulky and adds more weright to a phone. I kind of detest that and it is no extra feature for me! And you forgot to mention that the N900 lacks multi-touch input.

    All in all, I agree with you that the N900 is a great phone.

  • April 27, 2010 at 8:46 pm
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    But if you compare the 16Gb model of the iphone with the N900, then perhaps you’d see that the price ratio will tilt in favour of the iphone.

    1. Why should we compare the N900 with the 3GS 16GB model when the N900 is a 32GB device?

    2. Even at that, the N900 costs N93,000 and the 3GS 16GB costs only N132,000 – N135,000. Where’s the tilt favouring the 3GS?

    Cheers 😉

  • April 30, 2010 at 12:04 pm
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    Your point noted. The price of the iphone is that much because of middle men interference in the Nigerian Market. In the US, it is close to about 450 to 500 dollars. Also, the cost of unlocking it is put into the final cost in Nigeria.

    Thanks.

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