Scene 1 The iPhone 5 sports a dual-core processor but runs more fluid than many quad-core Android flagship smartphones. I suppose that we can expect

Raw Numbers Don't Mean Anything Anymore

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The iPhone 5 sports a dual-core processor but runs more fluid than many quad-core Android flagship smartphones. I suppose that we can expect similar results when it comes to iPad 4 versus quad-core Android tablets.

Scene 2
LG’s Optimus G has a 13 megapixel camera that doesn’t outperform the 8 megapixel cameras on competing mobiles. The Nokia 808 PureView’s camera produces 5 megapixel shots that outshine competing devices’ 8 megapixel camera shots.

Scene 3
The 808’s display is only 360 x 640 pixels in resolution, yet doesn’t display images any worse than I can see on the HTC One X’s 720 x 1280 pixel display.

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With a 2000 mAh Li-Ion battery, the Motorola RAZR i has better battery performance than other smartphones in its class with similar battery ratings.

More and more, we are seeing that raw numbers do not always indicate performance. Technology is advancing to the point where by fiddling with other factors, a manufacturer can produce better performance with a lower specified device. It is the reality of modern technology. Just looking at the raw specifications of a device can get you fooled. As a rule, you should play with the device to arrive at valid conclusions about performance.

It is an interesting world, this new world in which raw numbers mean nothing.

  1. Yes; like knowledge.. it is not what/who you know that counts; it us what you do with what/who you know ~ that makes all the difference.

    I suppose that we can expect similar results when it comes to iPad 4 versus quad-core Android tablets

    Not with “Project Butter”, I would imagine..

  2. Scene 3
    The 808?s display is only 360 x 640 pixels in resolution, yet doesn’t display images any worse than I can see on the HTC One X’s 720 x 1280 pixel display.

    You used the wrong parameters there. You ought to be using the dpi to determine the quality of the output picture and not screen pixel count. The bigger screens will be better in two-handed typing but may not necessarily produce sharper pictures.

    And an operating system that is close to traditional desktop PCs will definitely require more resources than one that cuts so many corners, shedding one of the hallmarks of conventional PCs like multitasking, which is what Apple did with iOS.

  3. You ought to be using the dpi to determine the quality of the output picture and not screen pixel count.

    @Harry, that fine line between pixel count and dpi..

    You seem to be implying that, given two displays with the SAME dpi, the larger display will have a HIGHER pixel count.
    that is, a bigger television screen will be less sharper than a smaller one, given the same dpi.
    Right?

    Dots per Inch

  4. How do you make something bigger and yet Smaller? Apple has the answer.
    Its an Amazing world where numbers don’t matter.
    What matters is how the devices perform in the wild.

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