Web is Dead my Posterior

Human beings enjoy hype. Usually the hype is achieved by ignoring the facts and dancing to one’s preferences and building images around those. You may have been told again and again how we live in an age of apps. Apps this, apps that. You m ay have been told that the web is dead or dying ( depending on who does the telling). You may have been told that unless your service has an app, it has no chance.

Don’t believe the hype. The web is still outgrowing apps at unimaginable rates.

Do the math. Every 7 days, the web grows in multiples of the total number of apps in the App Store. Ladies and gentlemen, the web is booming and doesn’t look like it is slowing down.

Web Or App?

As I have always said, certain ideas are best suited to apps, and certain others to web. It is your responsibility to decide which technology serves your project/business/service better and use it. But don’t let anyone fool you about having an app developed being essential. many times, it is just a waste of time and resources. For highly specialised and targeted services though, an app is almost a must.

Just don’t forget that your website is accessible on far more platforms and end devices than any app can ever hope to be. The web is universal. In terms of volume, I doubt that there will ever be any real competition between the two.

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

6 thoughts on “Web is Dead my Posterior

  • February 2, 2013 at 9:15 am
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    Spot on!

    while there are unnecessarily duplicative mobile apps for webapps, you hardly ever find unnecessary webapps equi Lents for apps.

    apps often spring from webapps, but not the reverse.

    I would almost always use webapp functional l equivalent of an app, whether possible.

    of course there are many things an app could handle, that a webapp can not accomplish. the reverse is almost NEVER the case.

    generally, an app is far more versatile , functionally, than any webapp can ever hope to be

  • February 2, 2013 at 10:15 am
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    How many of those 1.2million apps are personal websites, blogs and the like. The overwhelming majority I’m sure. The web is certainly not dead but if nothing else, its losing mind share. People don’t search for websites of services they have just heard of anymore, they search for them in the app store of their respective devices. It used to be the case that a product launched on the web first, and then released a slew of mobile apps that duplicated a few of the features found on the website, while leaving the rest web exclusive. Such apps could later gain an increased feature set, however, new features still landed on the web first. This could largely still be said to be true, however, with the advent of apps like Instagram, Vine and the like, mobile is put to the forefront first, and the web is little more than an afterthought. This is a trend that is increasingly becoming more prevalent. Mobile apps provide several advantages over web apps, which app developers are keen to tap into. That’s where everyone’s interest lies, or is going to lie moving forward, and since the major aim of a developer is to make money, that’s where his interest will lie also. Discoverability is also higher for apps than they are for websites, as the app store provides an avenue for that.
    The web is definitely not going anywhere anytime soon, and quite frankly, “the web” is a lot bigger than websites, n most of these apps depend on it in one way or the other. However, it is diminishing in mind share and this would eventually lead to less and less attention being paid to it by developers.
    Now, I’m not saying this is a particularly good thing. In fact, it isn’t really. It leads to a duplication of effort as several versions of the same app has to be developed for the major platforms, n the minor ones that don’t have as many users are left without a native app, and have to rely on the increasingly neglected web app.

  • February 2, 2013 at 10:55 am
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    Discoverability is also higher for apps than they are for websites

    discovering good content on the web is an area I am yet to see aattract enough focus.

    apart from http://www.stumbleupon.com (and the associated mobile app on different platforms), I am yet to see any other orderly method of discovering pertinent web apps on the web.

  • February 2, 2013 at 12:05 pm
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    I go with the web.

    And am so much following the progress of Chrome book and its applicability.

  • Pingback:On the viability of the Web | muyiscoi blog

  • February 3, 2013 at 7:15 pm
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    Apps are cool an all, but I still spend the vast majority of my time on the web compared to apps.

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