Why I left Samsung Galaxy S2 for Nokia N8!

SGSII-N8

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The debate about what smartphone OS is the best has been an ongoing and heated one. Is there a general best smartphone OS?

I don’t know if I am alone on this, but picking a single mobile device that suits my needs and meet my budget can be a very challenging task. I have moved from one mobile phone to the other in search of the smartphone that will meet my need just because I do not want to carry more than a single device.

How Did I Get Here?

Before I get into the meat of this article, permit me share a vital point with you.

I have however noticed how some people push for a particular device (or operating system) recommending it to others without first finding out what the unique needs of those people are. I think this is shortsightedness.

To make it clear, you may want to read this piece by Rita. She wrote about her unique needs as someone who resides in Lebanon.

She had once stayed in Paris where she enjoyed high-speed internet, both on wi-fi and on mobile internet (unlimited data). On moving back to Lebanon, she had to stay within a 150mb to 200mb internet data window per month.

200mb per month!? I don’t know how I can use 200mb in a month on my former Samsung Galaxy S2. Yes, former. You see, I have traded my Samsung Galaxy S2 for a Nokia N8. All these adventures of mine have given me a broad perspective about my needs and how different mobile phones can meet them.

Before you blindly go ahead and pick an Android, iPhone or a Windows Phone, please hear me out. You need to weigh your needs and pick your device based on accurate information available.

Why did I switch to the Nokia N8?

These are MY OWN reasons. Note: I am not trying to say that the Nokia N8 is the best phone for everyone. I am sharing from the perspective of MY needs. Those who share my views and have similar needs with me can then hop on a similar device.

1. The N8’s power lasts longer than my Samsung Galaxy S2, even if I use them for the same period. I have used the Nokia N8 for more than two months previously. This is my second time of buying it.

2. The internet data management on the N8 is minor. It is not as data hungry like the Android powered Galaxy S2.

I found out that I use between 2GB to 4GB on my mobile monthly. I download and try different applications, Youtube videos, pictures and sometimes tether my internet with other people’s devices and my PC.

I found out that the Samsung Galaxy’s power and data management was digging too deep into my pocket, as I do not have access to Wifi. All my internet needs are supplied by mobile internet data subscriptions. I would have kept the Samsung Galaxy S 2, got an extra battery (since the battery is replaceable) assuming I have access to free wireless internet.

3. The N8 is not as pricey as iPhone 4 or iPhone 4S, which were also on my list of options. I tried the iPhone 4 running iOS 4 for 24 hours and was impressed with the battery performance. I will eventually get an iPhone, but for now I do not have a budget for an iPhone. You know we do not get iPhones on contract packages here in Nigeria. We have to buy them cash down.

4. The Camera is superb. Not just because it has a 12 megapixel camera. The N8 simply shoots amazing pictures.

5. I can use one of my most preferred applications that is available only on Symbian – Gravity.

Things I am going to miss while using the Nokia N8

1. I will miss the swift and very fast UI of my Samsung Galaxy S2 (But I will save money and use less internet data now)

2. The productivity apps that I have grown fond of — Springpad, Evernote, Anydo, Bufferapp, Facebook for Android, Dolphin browser, plus the ability to download and read PDFs easily without stress.

Moving On

I hope to keep this Nokia N8 for a very long time. Even when I pick my next phone, which would most likely be an iPhone, the Nokia N8 will still remain with me.

There will always be a battle between fans of different OSes till the Lord’s kingdom comes. However, when we engage in those debates, let us keep things in perspective. We must consider specific factors in specific scenarios.

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0 thoughts on “Why I left Samsung Galaxy S2 for Nokia N8!”

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  2. Well written article indeed. I had a Nokia N8 hand-on before from a friend of mine who just migrated to smartphone. The UI, UX, fluidity and internet connectivity are serious minuses for me, my former N97 was even faster in internet connectivity. Going to the apps menu is another dumb down because you have to wait for sometime for it to load up the apps. It might have the best camera maybe because of 12 megapixel but is not enough trade off for me. For now SGS 2 will continue to be my primary smartphone pending when SGS 3 will be launched and available.
    @ Jesse Oguntimehin,
    “I found out that I use between 2GB to 4GB on my mobile monthly. I download and try different applications, Youtube videos, pictures and sometimes tether my internet with other people’s devices and my PC”.
    The ease with which you do that on SGS 2 is a big temptation to go beyond your data cap, try that on N8 and you will get tired of trial and error.

  3. The grass often LOOKs greener on the other side- UNTIL u cross over and see that the grass is actually painted with inferior green paint – anonymous

    Having tasted both doses, i believe the Poster has a better view of the platform ‘war’.

    I have often wondered why people (mostly geeks) appear fixated on what Operating System their phone runs. The average user wants to be able to do what he wants to do – with minimal fuss.

    I believe the things that people use their phones for are not so diverse. So, insisting that what you use your phone for should guide your choice of OS misses the mark somewhat. Practically any OS can be made to run on any hardware. I would therefore say that apart from your phone OS satisfying certain basic criteria (which I would soon list), the hardware should be determined by your specific needs.

    If you are interested in photography (I have ZERO interest), you need a phonw with good camera. If you are a media junkie, ensure your phone supports removable storage.If you believe in hardware QWERTY (I do NOT), get a phone offering that. If you do lots of browsing on your phone, a big screen size is for you.
    If you are on the road a lot, great battery life (general resource efficiency) and ease of portability are key.

    This is as far as hardware goes.

    Now to the OS.

    Your OS is the medium through which you interact with your device. Following are the things I minimally expect your OS to take care of:

    Numerous software titles for that platform – along with a solid ecosystem
    Stress_free Input into the device (touchscreen input or hardware input) – via OS suport)
    Ease of file transfer / communication with other devices (support for NFC, Bluetooth, USB transfer, etc)

    Getting a device that meets your hardware requirements, ALONG with an OS with all the attributes stated above is often a tricky thing to achieve!

  4. I have however noticed how some people push for a particular device (or operating system) recommending it to others without first finding out what the unique needs of those people are. I think this is shortsightedness.

    If someone on this site asks for advice concerning a particular platform or device, I simply offer my recommendation based on my understand of the platform or device. Anybody looking for a better advice that is tailored to his or her use case should also make effort to state his or her case clearer. It is as simpe as that.

    Before you blindly go ahead and pick an Android, iPhone or a Windows Phone, please hear me out. You need to weigh your needs and pick your device based on accurate information available.

    I once read a blog post on osnews.com that say: “There is nothing like an unbiased blogger” and I think it is mostly a fact. Leaving out Symbian in the list appear to say, of course you can’t go wrong picking a Symbian device blindly irrespective of whatever your needs may be.

    Though your tone may appear neutral, can’t you see you are projecting Symbian subconsciously. Nothing really wrong with that though.

    Battery life and data consumption are what we already know about and we are living with it.

  5. Hmmmmmm. My best fone in the whole wide world. You have said it all, let no one force any 1. You own the two fones and had d 1st hand experience of both and decides to make your choice full STOP. @mister mobility did u mean to say 2 years or “2 months”? If I may ask again, did the new N8 comes with Belle pre-installed or u will wait for the official release or u ar going to flash it again like before?

  6. Why am I not hearing about Blackberry. The os (6and 7) are fluid like,they have a good catalogue of apps (they may not have millions of apps but the little they have perform superbly). I recomend bb for anyone who wants to spend a lot of data and really wants to pay small 1500 for 3gig.

  7. Jesse, both you and Rita have reinforced the point I made in the article about Android consuming more data; if you can afford it, buy and enjoy the data and the SGS2. If not, stick to something that caters to your needs in your current environment.

    Like Rita I’ve learned to adjust to significantly less mobile internet data. Most of my apps are redundant in Nigeria anyway, but at least I have internet access.

  8. @good I need a BB with OS 7, not too big of a screen, with qwerty&touch screen, with autofocus cam(5mp) and NFC. All these I can get on BB 9790. When it comes out let me kno.

  9. Harry, for those who have same need as I have now and also don’t have access to wifi, I asked that they be careful in choosing Android, iOS and Windows Phones. I left Nokia out cos it’s data management is superb.

    GOOD, you’re right. Blackberry can help save data and i left it out. I have not used blackberry for more than a month. The epileptic BIS makes me run from it, plus most of my fav apps are missing. Blackberry can also help to save data, just that the battery sucks.

  10. Though your tone may appear neutral, can’t you see you are projecting Symbian subconsciously

    Of course he was projecting Symbian CONSCIOUSLY. did u read that REFERENCED blog post @ all?

    I simply offer my recommendation based on my understand of the platform or device

    I believe the best people to ask for advice are people that have actually been on bring sides of under fence. People like our Mr. Mobility, this poster and that referenced poster. They have no reason to be biased.

    Battery life and data consumption are what we already know about and we are living with it.

    And of course, it can be WORSE than that, i suppose? Hmm..

    Well, since Symbian does not suffer from those crucial / critical evils, how about capitulating and surrendering to the school of thought that Symbian is simply better at the IMPORTANT things? (a man can dream, abi?)

  11. Wow Jesse, the trade-off – data economy/sturdy batteries as against superior UI/healthier apps ecosystem is huge both ways, it must have been a hard decision to make. I however must agree with your intention to pick up an iPhone in future. While accomodating a second opinion, I’m of the opinion that Apple is the only platform that has found and maintained that sweet spot between stellar hardware, great battery life and a thriving apps ecosystem. Now if only the price would go down…

  12. Bankole,

    I find it difficult to go the iPhone route for the same reason I am finding it difficult to embrace Windows Phone – the locked ecosystem. No USB mass storage and no file transfer via Bluetooth.

    Serious issues for me. For now. Who knows tomorrow?

  13. @Eye.Bee.Kay

    Of course he was projecting Symbian CONSCIOUSLY. did u read that REFERENCED blog post @ all?

    Of course I did. That is another Symbian lover doing his thing. Didn’t you read down through the comments?

    On my Android phone, I use K-9 Mail as my push email client, I’m now using TweetDeck for both Twitter and Facebook, I have Google Weather widget always there, I do extensive browsing with Opera Mini, I have Google Android Market updater always on and I almost visit the Google Android Market every day and still stay within the 200/260 data cap. Who is the writer of that post trying to impress or deceive. Well, if he thinks that is some piece of magic, I can replicate it on my Android phone.

    I believe the best people to ask for advice are people that have actually been on bring sides of under fence . People like our Mr. Mobility , this poster and that referenced poster . They have no reason to be biased.

    Tell that to those North American and European bloggers that have also tested Symbian and other devices and have declared Symbian as utter crap when compare with the likes of Android and iOS devices. People want phones they just pick and start using, not the one they buy and go through steep learning curve to grasp how to do the most basic task. Data consumption can be managed, but I don’t know how to use Symbian devices so that I don’t have to go through layers of awkward list of unintuitive menus to do basic tasks.

    Well, since Symbian does not suffer from those crucial/critical evils, how about capitulating and surrendering to the school of thought that Symbian is simply better at the IMPORTANT things ? (a man can dream, abi?)

    You really think you know what important things ought to be in mobiles? That’s ease of use. Give your Symbian device to any person that has not been thought the crooked and convoluted way Symbian does most basic tasks and it becomes a useless piece of brick.

  14. I do believe mobile phone usage should be a thing of choice,but in my own case once it get the work done perfectly well,i leave the gimmicks to the rest ones.My nokia N900 has never disappointed me.Infact,it makes me see any other phone i ever used as a feature phone.Legendary N900!

  15. I don’t know if I am alone on this, but picking a single mobile device that suits my needs and meet my budget can be a very challenging task.

    Its quite tasking.

  16. lovely piece by Jesse. One good thing from his write is the fact that no one can know how best a device satisfies a user’s need but the user itself. However, there is also this fact that a lot of people only celebrate their device because they are yet to try others out. The grass can sometimes be greener on the other side.

    The sgs2 is a fantastic device as far as am concerned. Even Jesse attested to great things she will be missing. However, There are these things I do on sgs2 that the N8 cannot offer. I have used the N8 for 48hrs before and playing asphalt6 on it was a drag compared to on my sgs2. I don’t want to imagine how modern combat 3 and 9mm (2gig games each) will feel on the N8.

    Movies are richer on the super amoled screen with great surround sounds which I can’t get on the N8.

    I must give it to N8 for data management while browsing. But browsing on my 4.3′ wide screen is a better attraction.
    Battery is not a problem for me. i get a full day usage. If at all, one can decide to get the 2000mah size that will last more than 24hrs.

    There are several other reasons why I enjoy what I use my sgs2 for than if it were on the N8. Same goes for Jesse I guess. So really, it just boils down to what rocks ones boat.

  17. @Harry, you mean to tell us that you do all that on an android phone and still stay within the 200/250mb data cap?

    That is simply unbelievable! Especially when you say you leave android market updater on. How are you able to pull this off?

  18. I can agree with Jesse on many points here. However, having used the N8 for about a week, i decided its not a phone for me. My bone of contention with it being the less than smooth and slow browser. Sorry if some folks feel otherwise, but when you have used the likes of iPhone, the browser of N8 feels like crap. Then the sheer numbers of apps available on the apple market is a plus. (moreso the medical apps).

    Nevertheless iPhone falls when you think of file transfer and ability to download any file into storage for later transfer and use. (try downloading an sis file through opera mini with your iPhone while on the move for transfer later to your mum’s symbian phone) A feat Blackberry can easily handle. Android from v2,3,3 and above can handle such also.

    I stick with iPhone for now because of my needs but am sure i will replace my iPhone 4 with an android as soon as i get another iPad tablet. Android would then be my choice smartphone, data/battery guzzling notwithstanding, while i use ipad for my other needs. But a symbian with all its battery economy is just not for me. I jumped off the burning platform years ago and i ain’t coming back.

    So, its all a matter of choice. No matter how horrible the choice may look to others. Am sure we all know that one man’s meat is another’s ….

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