Your mobile as a PC/laptop replacement?

Convergence makes a lot of sense. Though it has its disadvantages, it has more going for it in an environment like ours.

pc-replace1Last Saturday, I was part of a discussion about the benefits of having private internet access. One of the key problems raised was that of the terrible power supply situation in the country. Someone pointed out that a monthly internet subscription becomes wasteful when there is no power supply to put the subscription to good use.

Of course, I did not need to mention that even with a power generator available, the subscription is still largely under-utilised, and even then the extra costs of running a generating set are just obscene.

I pointed out at that discussion – waving my Nokia E90 in the air – that only those of us who use connected mobile devices really put our subscription to full use – regardless of time, location and availability of public power.

If you need internet access, I recommend that you strongly consider a mobile device and internet subscription. This makes sense financially and functionally.

The E90, for example, in all its glory is cheaper than a laptop and gives you longer hours of usage on battery than a laptop does.

There are places where it would be foolish to take a laptop to e.g. your friend’s wedding, yet no-one would bat an eye-lid at seeing your communicator there. We must also not forget those outdated eateries that want to tantalize you but post bold signs that read: “The use of laptops is not allowed in here“. Of course, my E90 gets in all the time and gets used too. They are really clueless; aren’t they?

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After church service on Sunday, a group of us were chatting and someone asked for the location of a cultural centre in Lagos. He needed to find his way there that afternoon. None of us present knew. But Google did – and my communicator was available. In a few minutes, he had the address he was looking for. Thank God for mobility!

samsung-f700The problem of text input is largely resolved on devices with QWERTY-layout keyboards. Copy and paste functionality exists on many of them, and most have capabilities to read and edit Office documents. The majority come with the ability to read PDF files as well. These things are computers – albeit very handy ones.

Honestly, if you are not a programmer, graphics designer and the like, you are on a budget and need an internet device and connection, instead of shelling out for a PC/Laptop and getting a fixed internet connection, you can have a single device with access to internet access anywhere.

Usually, people are hesitant in considering that some mobile devices can serve effectively as PC replacements. For what most people use their PCs for, many mobile devices are more than qualified as PC replacements.

If you have questions on this, I’d be delighted to help you sift through the maze of mobility to narrow down your search for the right device for you. So, post your questions below!

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

5 thoughts on “Your mobile as a PC/laptop replacement?

  • February 27, 2009 at 9:23 am
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    Nice piece Yomi.

    The subject of the mobile device replacing the PC in many respects has been one I have used to convince friends and families on the need to not just get any phone, but smartphones.

    While this might be old gist, it is worth yet another mention just to drive home the point. Several of my reviews on this blog were written entirely on my Nokia E71 and sent via e-mail on the same phone.

    Yomi if you don’t mind, I think you forgot to mention the issue of portability. The mobile device is far more easier to carry around than even small notebooks.

  • February 27, 2009 at 11:23 am
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    Yomi if you don’t mind, I think you forgot to mention the issue of portability. The mobile device is far more easier to carry around than even small notebooks.

    U can say that again Dayo. I wonder how I would have survived if I didn’t have a smart phone. I recently went on a 10-day break on which I decided to limit my internet activities cos I wanted to rest. I can boldly say that I didn’t miss out on much cos I always carried my mobile device with me anywhere I went.

    As a matter of fact, my friends and family members have certified me mobile crazy cos I hardly drop my phone these days, lol. Some of then wonder how I cope. They can’t believe that you can get so much done just on a small piece of gadget. It is simply amazing.

  • February 28, 2009 at 5:49 am
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    Yes, Dayo; you are right that I left portability out. ***Knocks self on the head…

    We certainly cannot keep even a netbook in our trouser or coat pockets now; can we?

    Smartphones are extremely portable. Thanks for chipping in.

  • February 28, 2009 at 10:02 am
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    I don’t own a smartphone now (though, i used to) but i hope to get one real soon. Even wit my ‘very cheap’ regular phone(nokia 2600c), i still manage 2 use it for everything possible (like emails,rss,wordpress etc. thru operamini) in places where i wouldn’t dare 2 use my laptop. (e.g. In a danfo bus). I believe mobile internet trend usage will continue to increase, though the sad case is that many people are not willin to pay for what they use.

    -You guys are doing a great job. U inspire me.

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