Your Phone Isn't Mobile If It's Plugged Into A Wall

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Motorola’s media campaign about the battery performance of the RAZR MAXX captures my very sentiments. One key line says, “Your Phone Isn’t mobile If it’s Plugged Into A Wall”. Superb! Motorola has been setting the pace for battery performance on Android smartphones in recent times. Forget the iPhone. Forget Samsung’s Galaxy range (including the S III and Note II). Those devices are good with battery life, but Motorola does it best now when it comes to keeping a smartphone going on and on.

It is a common sight to see people carrying phone chargers all around with them. One at home, one in the car, another in the office, and possibly a portable charger too. The idea is to keep our super smartphones alive all through the day. I have always hated having to nurse a phone through the day. I hate it the most when I have a busy day out and about.

Standards

You know how 8 megapixels seem to have become the new standard for flagship devices. You know how 4-inch plus displays are the new standard for flagship devices. While there is usually no formal consensus, standards get adopted when one manufacturer pushes the boundaries. That is what competition does. Which is why I am hoping that other manufacturers will respond to Motorola’s awesome new drive to produce smartphones with superb battery life. The US manufacturer has mostly achieved this by fitting their newest flagships with batteries of over 3,000 mAh rating. Note also that despite the huge power ratings, the RAZR MAXX devices are still very slim and trim.

So far, none of the big players look to be picking up the gauntlet. In my opinion, flagship devices like the Samsung Galaxy S III, Nokia Lumia 920, Apple iPhone 5, and HTC One X+ should pack a minimum of 3,000 mAh battery rating. Anything less than 3000 mAh in a flagship smartphone just won’t do. The standard has been set. If Motorola can put in a 3,000 mAh battery in their smartphones, what stops others from doing it?

Let us hope that 2013 is the year that we shall see the great battery life that we have all been wishing for on our respective smartphone OS flagships.

9 comments

  1. Battery technology has been pushed to the extreme.

    unless a new technology comes into play, battery life will basically just be a function of how big it is (the volume), all other factors held constant.

    A wide screened phone has a bigger surface area than a smaller screened one.

    it is therefore easy to fit a bigger battery into such devices, giving it longer battery life. The space is there.

    if battery consumption is NOT directly proportional to screen real estate, then the bigger a screen is, the more battery efficient it can be. you simply put a big battery under that that sprawling screen real estate.

    it may explain why a device like the Galaxy Note Ii has such good battery life.

  2. … While there is usually no formal consensus, standards get adopted when one manufacturer pushes the boundaries. That is what competition does. Which is why I am hoping that other manufacturers will respond to Motorola’s awesome new drive to produce smartphones with superb battery life. …

    Yeah, that’s a general rule but maybe why we have not seen seen the industry adopting huge battery sizes in general is because Motorola’s effort has not translated to a huge success in terms of mass adoption of their devices. I think it’s a question of we consumers voting with out cash. I think the manufacturers will be investing in whatever area they believe is giving Samsung Galaxy series edge over other devices. It is us the consumers that will tell the manufacturers where to invest in next by voting with our cash and not our wishes. If we have elevated Motorola devices ahead of the Galaxy series, manufacturers will get the message faster than wishes.

    This is going to be a little more complicated than this though. For instance, it is obvious that the Samsung Galaxy Note II that has been making the headlines, though not the best performer when it comes to battery life, is well above average in this area among other bells and whistles. So, no matter how big the battery capacity, there are some other goodies that will help to make a device stand out from the crowd.

    What I’m saying in effect is, not withstanding that our own Mr. Mo is a sucker for huge battery size and battery performance, he still chose Samsung Galaxy Note II ahead of the Motorola RAZR MAXX as his smartphone of 2012. He is clearly voting for a combination of design and features that appeals to him most even though he will still appreciate better battery on the device.

  3. Harry oooooo!

    What I’m saying in effect is, not withstanding that our own Mr. Mo is a sucker for huge battery size and battery performance, he still chose Samsung Galaxy Note II ahead of the Motorola RAZR MAXX as his smartphone of 2012.

    No! No! No! 🙂

    I didn’t choose the Note II over the RAZR MAXX. I never got a RAZR MAXX to review. Trust me…. if I got one to review…..

    Buhahaha!

  4. Forgive me Mr. Mo. Guess I was carried away there or something. But I still doubt you will choose the RAZR MAXX over the Samsung Galaxy Note II. Not putting it on you, but I know a number of unique features on the Note II did the magic.

  5. Na BB owners I pity pass. That is their trademark. They are always with their chargers. At trainings, seminars, or just when visiting the bank. It’s so sad. With the Note2 I have never ever had to go on a charger chase. I always have enough juice.

  6. 3,000 mAH is all so sexy. But realistically my advice (based on what is readily available in the market) is at worst never ever go for a device below 1,500 mAH. Cheers.

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