The aimless wandering of Tizen OS

The title of this article was inspired by a tweet by David Dube:


Back in December 2012, I wrote the article, Collaborations Gone Sour – Tizen Going The Way Of MeeGo? In that article, I highlighted how I am no fan of collaborations in the mobile industry, because they just drag on and on and eventually die off. I pointed at MeeGo, Symbian Foundation (please note the difference between Symbian as run solely by Nokia before the Symbian Foundation was formed), and Limo. Tizen is an open-source, Linux-based platform having Samsung and Intel as the main promoters. It is similar to Android and once looked like a promising alternative to that. It has since lost that appeal.

This is over a year after that article of mine and Tizen still isn’t more than an insignificant speck in the smartphone ocean. Yes; Samsung has just announced that its next Gear smartwatches will be powered by Tizen OS, but what does that count in real terms?

Samsung Gear 2 - Gear 2 Neo - Tizen

Tizen OS on smartwatches is simply no threat to anything in the smartphone space. Yes; we may also see a Samsung smartphone running Tizen soon. But unless we see least 700,000 Tizen apps to replicate most of the existing apps in the over 900,000-strong Android ecosystem, Tizen is DOA on phones. Yes; the ability to install and run Android’s .APK files may be implemented in Tizen, but just like David Dube also has said, that would provide for little differentiation. Why exactly would anyone pick a Tizen phone over an Android phone? That is the very question that many are asking about BlackBerry 10 now.

Also read:  Glo Biiiig Dash discontinued

Till the picture changes, Tizen is a mobile OS aimlessly wandering around looking for a foothold.

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

0 thoughts on “The aimless wandering of Tizen OS

  • February 24, 2014 at 7:36 am
    Permalink

    Decision making in the technology space could be a huge gamble at times. Some are aimed at running the competition down, some simply motivated by what the decision makers believe to be the best option at the points they were being made.

    Intel are now struggling to register strong presence in the mobile ecosystem that’s mainly dominated by ARM architecture when they could’ve keyed into the fight from onset but their hegemonic control of personal computing that’s literally synonymous with Microsoft Windows operating system and by extension Intel before Apple launched the first iPhone wouldn’t let them support a competing platform that could undermine their almost monopolistic control in microprocessors for personal computing industry then.

    When Intel declined joining the Android project, they believe that will help cause the project to fail, leaving Windows operating system as the king for personal computing and Intel to continue dictating the pace in the processors that power them. It is only the slowdown that Windows operating system is experiencing lately and the overwhelming success of Android and iOS, that Intel have little role in that’s pushing them to try to bring an alternative since they are also finding it very difficult breaking in into the mobile space via Android, iOS or even Windows Phone.

    There has to be stronger motivation or need for Tizen to succeed.

  • February 24, 2014 at 9:22 am
    Permalink

    Yes; the ability to install
    and run Android’s .APK files may be
    implemented in Tizen, but just like David
    Dube also has said, that would provide for
    little differentiation. Why exactly would
    anyone pick a Tizen phone over an Android
    phone? That is the very question that many
    are asking about BlackBerry 10 now.

    Samsung for instance implemented a multiWindow system on the Samsung Note Series. I expect Google to have implemented that almost immediately in the core OS…as it is an awesome feature.

    If Tizen can also run Android apps flawlessly. as well as add all those extra features like smart scroll. smart stay and others. Samsung would surely make a splash.

    Why would I not buy a Samsung running a Tizen of i can still access all those android apps. as well as the added benefits thst Samsung has (will) added (add).

    My greatest reason for wanting Samsung to have Operating Systemic.. freedom. is to have no impediment inhibiting innovation at the Speed Of Samsung…as they are doing in hardware.

    if Tizen can run Android flawlessly. they would have ovecone the app paucity problem. The second hurdle would be providing and honing alternatives to all those Google Services.. And that should not be a daunting problem….

Leave a Reply

Advertisements
Advertisements