Documents Editing for Android Devices

Documents Editing for Android Devices 1One of the earlier handicaps of the Android OS was the lack of documents viewer, as well as a documents editing suite on the early models. While there were a handful of third party solutions available, these were quite off the mark and didn’t quite fill the gap.

Then came along the HTC Magic with a documents viewer from the Quickoffice, but no editing suite.

Thankfully, DataViz has stepped up to the plate with Documents To Go for Android, a full suite of documents viewer and editor.  Now, users can view and edit Microsoft® Word, Excel®, PowerPoint® and Adobe® PDF files without skimping on features on their Android-powered Smartphone. Documents To Go supports latest Microsoft Office & Adobe formats (doc, docx, xls, xlsx, ppt, pptx & pdf).

At this time, the competing QuickOffice application still does not support document EDIT or viewing of Office 2007 documents for Word (.docx) and Excel (.xlsx),so if you need editing, Documents To Go is the direction to look.

The good news is that the Documents To Go viewer is available as a free download from the Android Market.  However, if you also need to edit on your Android device, you will need to upgrade the suite for a fee.

Mister Mobility

I started blogging about mobile in 2004 as a fun way to share my passion for gadgets and mobile services. My other interests include digital media, speaking and teaching, photography, travelling, and dancing.

16 thoughts on “Documents Editing for Android Devices

  • February 6, 2010 at 6:25 am
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    It was only a matter of time. Eventually, Android phones would have native support for editing office documents.

  • February 8, 2010 at 12:12 pm
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    High end phones are not supposed to come wthout office document editors.

    When you decide to buy these phones, you made up your mind to buy the best. Why on earth should they not put in the best features and apps?

  • February 8, 2010 at 12:21 pm
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    deoladoctor,

    A very good point, and one we have made repeatedly though we have been opposed on that issue. It is just odd that anyone would argue that one should spend a premium on a high-end smartphone and have to purchase a third party application in order to be able to view/edit documents, for example…

  • February 8, 2010 at 1:22 pm
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    Sometimes, it is good to reopen an open wound to have proper healing (dont know if DeolaDoctor would agree with this o!).

    This issue of having preinstalled applications on a high-end device – software have a way of getting obsolete very quickly. Therefore, no matter how ‘loaded. your premium device is (in terms of preinstalled software – out-of-the-box @ the time of purchase), and as your needs / requirements evolve/change, you will need to continually upgrade, uninstall and install (new / better) applications!

    If my device is ‘closed’ in terms of software extensibility, it is not a ‘premium’ device (no matter its native capabilities ‘out-of-the-box’ – Samsung Jet- note!).

    Nokia, for instance, recognises the importance (and need for ‘open systems’) by having ‘betalabs’. This unit is into production of software (for Nokia) under a ‘non-critical’ environment. Related to this is the recent decision by Nokia to make Symbian ‘Open Source’.

    As regards the issue of inadequate memory on the Nokia 5800, for instance, ‘betaLabs recently produced ‘RambLo’ to address this. There is also CellPhoneSoft Swiss Manager Pro. A memory manager to die for on Symbian 60 5th Edition. BetaLabs also recently released ‘Nokia Custom Dictionary’ which allows access to – and manipulation of – the t9 dictionary of some Nokia phones (5800 inclusive).

    Like I must have mentioned – ad nauseum – to the point of nausea – it is is pointless to expect that, having purchased a premium, upscale device, you will not need to install much software (‘3 @ most’) to get the best utilitarian value from it.

    To me, what makes a phone ‘premium’ is the service I get from my device. Whether out-of-the-box, or software assisted – is inconsequental!

    To me, there is ALMOST NOTHING I wish to do on my phone that I have not been able to do (with an array of the right software applications to get the job done). The trick is to know if ‘there is an application for that’.

    Now, let the ‘stones’…(** takes cover **)

  • February 8, 2010 at 3:07 pm
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    EyeBeeKay,

    This issue of having preinstalled applications on a high-end device – software have a way of getting obsolete very quickly. Therefore, no matter how ‘loaded. your premium device is (in terms of preinstalled software – out-of-the-box @ the time of purchase), and as your needs / requirements evolve/change, you will need to continually upgrade, uninstall and install (new / better) applications!

    You do not have to install third party applications to escape obsolete software. For example, Nokia E-series smartphones come with a built-in office editing app, but a free update was made available for them.

    Now, that’s what we call premium devices and premium service.

    If my device is ‘closed’ in terms of software extensibility, it is not a ‘premium’ device (no matter its native capabilities ‘out-of-the-box’ – Samsung Jet- note!).

    The Samsung Jet is not a smartphone. The tag “Smarter than smartphone” is marketing. In our response to DeolaDoctor, we specified “smartphones”.

    Nokia, for instance, recognises the importance (and need for ‘open systems’) by having ‘betalabs’. This unit is into production of software (for Nokia) under a ‘non-critical’ environment. Related to this is the recent decision by Nokia to make Symbian ‘Open Source’.

    Straying again. This discussion is not about smartphones (ability to install and run native apps) versus non-smartphones (inability to install and run native apps).

    As regards the issue of inadequate memory on the Nokia 5800, for instance, ‘betaLabs recently produced ‘RambLo’ to address this.

    The 5800 is not a high-end device (if we stick to topic and not stray any further as you tend to do), and so its inadequacies are understandable. What is unacceptable is for a flagship device like the N97 or an X6 to also need a prop in order to do what it should be doing out-of-the-box.

    If Alireta sells you a 500mb web hosting account for N50,000 a year and you discovered after purchase that you can’t run MySQL, PHP4, IMAP email or cron jobs on it, we are pretty certain that you won’t think its okay and then simply go look for a way to hack that functionality into it. We’d like to read your response to this.

    Like I must have mentioned – ad nauseum – to the point of nausea – it is is pointless to expect that, having purchased a premium, upscale device, you will not need to install much software (‘3 @ most’) to get the best utilitarian value from it.

    Three (3) is not much. That’s a few. No-one has argued that high-end (premium) devices do not need third party apps. The argument is that it is crazy to have to look for third party apps for built-in functionality or for functionality that is taken for granted in that range of devices.

    To me, what makes a phone ‘premium’ is the service I get from my device. Whether out-of-the-box, or software assisted – is inconsequential!

    That’s moving the goalpost in the middle of the match, and a recipe for confusion. The term “premium” has an established definition. We do not care what you want it to mean. We already know what it means.

    Who knows, perhaps we at Alireta can sit down and decide what we want the terms “smartphone”, “mobile internet” and others to mean too?

    To me, there is ALMOST NOTHING I wish to do on my phone that I have not been able to do (with an array of the right software applications to get the job done). The trick is to know if ‘there is an application for that’.

    We have no arguments against this. That is the whole essence of smartphones.

    Still, please understand that this works for you because you would belong in the class of geeks and you love toying with things. The average, busy professional e.g. accountant, lawyer, architect, etc, who buys premium devices on the average do not have the time or the desire to fiddle with their devices after purchase. They want it to have certain features right out of the box, and to work the way it is advertised right from the word “Go”.

    They do not mind paying the extra, and they expect a premium device to deliver.

    You sound like these other geek guys who argue about how wonderful Linux is – if you can dedicate the time to tweak it, and spend hours online finding solutions to things that work out of the box on Windows and Mac systems. While we have no problems with anyone who wants to live like that, the rest of the world wants things more straightforward and will stay away from Linux till it delivers more out of the box.

    Did we throw any stones? 🙂

  • February 8, 2010 at 8:38 pm
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    EyeBeeKay doesnt seem to get the point. To start with,an open wound is already open so no point talking about reopening. This is a topic that will continue to generate comments because no one likes to be taken for granted. You buy a premium phone, you expect nothing less than premium funtionality and features. Document viewer is so basic it has to be taken as standard on high end phones. If its not present, we feel we do not get our money’s worth. Of course, ability to upgrade is also a feature of any premium phone that’s worth its salt. But out of box, you expect nothing less than than a very good doc viewer.

  • February 9, 2010 at 6:01 am
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    It would appear that the crux of this dialogue is: what makes a phone ‘premium’ and what makes a phone ‘smart’?

    I agree with your definition of ‘smartphone’ but I totally dis-agree with your definition and understanding of what makes a device ‘premium’.

    You once threw a dictionary definition of ‘premium’ @ me. And you seem pretty certain that you have the meaning sewn up tight.

    If a Nokia 5800 sells for 42k and a Samsung jet is over 50k, I have problems in knowing how you determine ‘premium-ship’, if you will pardon my Swahili!.

    People often assume that price has a direct correlation with value. Not necessarily. Not always. Can anyone give me a good reason why I would shell out good money on a BlackBerry – a mere status symbol?

    Professionals do not have time to tweak. Agreed. But them, nobody can be an aexpert in everything. If you have a tool you value, and you are too busy or do not have the requisite knowledge to hone it, give it to somebody who does.

    I once challenged you to point out to me a sINGLE THING that the Nokia E90 can do that ANY SMARTPHONE can not (with or without software). Will truly like to be educated on this, as I did not get am answer!

    Conclusively, and for the umpteenth time, there is nothing like ‘basic functionality’ in a supposedly upscale phone. What is basic to ‘A’ may be unimportant to ‘B’ (and vice versa). A Blogger/Novelist would cherish ‘Office Document support’ inbuilt. A Computer Scientist would probably not give a hoot!

    A doctor would cherish an update-able Medical Dictionary (are you there DeolaDoctor?), while an Astro-Physicist would really appreciate an ultra-capable and programmable scientific Calculator.

    What variety of software are you going to have on a ‘premium’ device, outofthebox, then (to satisfy the divergent and varied offer of people?

    I say, let individals decide what is basic to them and stop over-emphasizing on the functions (aka software) that are resident outofthebox…

    Manufacturers can concentrate more on OS with better user experience, (more)better memory (management), better battery life, better display technologies. To me, THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT MAKE A DEVICE ‘PREMIUM’, not necessarily the array of software resident on it outofthebox…

  • February 9, 2010 at 6:12 am
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    @DeolaDoctor, I earlier said, ‘Sometimes, it is good to reopen an OPEN wound to have proper healing..’. A slip of the fingers.

    What I meant to say was, ‘Sometimes, it is good to reopen an OLD wound to have proper healing..’.

  • February 9, 2010 at 6:44 am
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    It would appear that the crux of this dialogue is: what makes a phone ‘premium’ and what makes a phone ’smart’?

    No sir, we already know what makes a device smart and what makes it premium. Those definitions have been established. This discussion is about why someone should pay say N70,000 for a smartphone (not just any mobile device) and not get an office documents viewer out of the box.

    You once threw a dictionary definition of ‘premium’ @ me. And you seem pretty certain that you have the meaning sewn up tight.

    Sorry, but we didn’t make up that definition. You have a problem with the definition, re-write the English language and overhaul how the world runs.

    If a Nokia 5800 sells for 42k and a Samsung jet is over 50k, I have problems in knowing how you determine ‘premium-ship’, if you will pardon my Swahili!.

    You seem to have some undeclared beef with the Samsung jet. Nowhere have we listed the Jet as a premium or high-end device. The ones we mentioned, you keep ignoring.

    Conclusively, and for the umpteenth time, there is nothing like ‘basic functionality’ in a supposedly upscale phone. What is basic to ‘A’ may be unimportant to ‘B’ (and vice versa). A Blogger/Novelist would cherish ‘Office Document support’ inbuilt. A Computer Scientist would probably not give a hoot!

    A doctor would cherish an update-able Medical Dictionary (are you there DeolaDoctor?), while an Astro-Physicist would really appreciate an ultra-capable and programmable scientific Calculator.

    Sir, there is a difference between basic functionality and specialised functionality. Manufacturers cannot specialise for everyone, but they can put in features that are standard in a particular price range for a class of device. A Medical Dictionary is a specialized application.

    Specialised functionality is what third party apps should provide in the price range of high-end smartphones.

    Built-in documents editing is standard on high-end smartphones. Even low-end smartphones have at least a viewer built-in. As a rule, people who go for smartphones want documents viewing/editing. Even doctors read office documents.

    I once challenged you to point out to me a sINGLE THING that the Nokia E90 can do that ANY SMARTPHONE can not (with or without software). Will truly like to be educated on this, as I did not get am answer!

    We did answer that. As usual, you ignored it, as you have a habit of doing. Please, go fetch that discusssion and read it again.

    PS: By the way, for someone who wants answers, you are pretty good at not answering our own questions, but we’ve come to expect that from you by now 😉

    Like DeolaDoctor and others have said, you just don’t get it.

  • February 9, 2010 at 7:20 am
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    People often assume that price has a direct correlation with value. Not necessarily. Not always.

    True. At times, life is not only about value.

    For example, you could have wedded without the kind of ceremony you held, but you held the ceremony anyway, spending more than was actually necesarry. A bridal train does not add any real value to a wedding ceremony or marriage itself, but we are betting that you had one. All those nice clothings and accessories. Pure waste in terms of value (notice the italics, don’t take it literally).

    Can anyone give me a good reason why I would shell out good money on a BlackBerry – a mere status symbol?

    We can’t give you, because you obviously do not need it. Plus, you don’t also seem to be able to appreciate anything but what you alone want (or need?).

    People who buy Blackberrys and iPhones know why they choose them. Status perhaps? And even status has some measure of value, real or perceived. Maybe usability? Perhaps some other reason? Personally, here at Alireta we are not fans of Blackberrys and iPhones, because they do not fit our profile, but it would be silly of us to dismiss those devices as a waste of money for those who do choose to use them.

    Back to point, for the price that Android devices carry, being smartphones, documents viewing and editing should not be missing. If we were discussing status or vanity products like Nokia’s Vertu series, who cares what’s on the phone? But functional smartphones?

  • February 9, 2010 at 11:04 am
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    To stray further, as you claim I love to do, anybody can interprete the bible the way it suits him. You can pick a passage, and use it t support (or shoot down!) any argument. It does not necessarily change anything.

    You accuse me of ignoring certain comments (and questions)and latching up on others when it is convenient for me to do so. Dont we all do that? Very few human beings can be totally objective about issues. We hear what we want to hear and interprete what we see based on preconceived prejudices.

    Selective vision is a tactic you effectively use yourself. You highlight a paragraph that will support your position, and ignore the ones to which you have no response!

    Like with the Bible, you need to read and understand within contexts!

    You once wrote that, when you buy a ‘premium’ device, you do not expect to have to install more than three thirdparty applications on it. Our discourse is NOT merely about having a doc editor installed! We are talking about a concept here!

    You may be right factually. But conceptually, you are the one that misses the point!

    I will reiterate. For the LAST time. There is nothing like ‘basic functionalities’ in any software being preinstalled on any highend phone. You can not determine for the people what they need as basic functions on their high end phones. While you think a document editor is essential (being a Blogger, Preacher – among other things) on an upscale phone, I think a capable file explorer (e.g LonelyCatGames Xplorer ) is more essential on a high-faltutin device. Other people may think certain functions are essential too.

    I shall pursue this NO further since our positions seem set in concrete.

    And do not be so quick to negatively judge obduracy of opinion. Nothing is right and nothing is wrong. It all depends on your perception of things. Some nice philosophy to round this up for you there!

  • February 9, 2010 at 11:45 am
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    EyeBeeKay baba, u saId, ” If you have a tool you value, and you are too busy or do not have the requisite knowledge to hone it, give it to somebody who does.”

    Really? In this context? So if I buy a TV set and it is not receiving signals as clear as the manufacturer said it will, it is required of me that I have enough knowledge to “hone” it; right?

    What of a car whose engine is underpowered – I need to know enough to sit down, get dirty and tune it? Alireta’s analogy of Linux geeks is spot on.

    Lastly, you said, “Nothing is right and nothing is wrong”. That statement qualifies you for a national demerit award.

  • February 9, 2010 at 12:00 pm
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    To stray further, as you claim I love to do, anybody can interprete the bible the way it suits him. You can pick a passage, and use it t support (or shoot down!) any argument.

    Which is something you would be good at, looking at the train of your contributions here in general.

    You accuse me of ignoring certain comments (and questions)and latching up on others when it is convenient for me to do so. Dont we all do that?

    No; we all don’t. Some of us don’t. We at least try to look at all facts, information, evidence and factors on ground. And we do not mind saying we were wrong when we need to.

    Selective vision is a tactic you effectively use yourself. You highlight a paragraph that will support your position, and ignore the ones to which you have no response!

    Really? We see all you write; we just don’t think that every statement you make deserves a response – especially when they are off-track and that has been pointed out already. That would be useless repetition.

    You once wrote that, when you buy a ‘premium’ device, you do not expect to have to install more than three thirdparty applications on it.

    We are not sure what review that is and who wrote it – the team, or just one of us – Yom or Dayo. Still, our personal preference does not in any way override established definitions and standards. That sentiment you refer to is personal and we do not impose it on standards or try to redefine established definitions to conform to it – something you should learn from us.

    Our discourse is NOT merely about having a doc editor installed! We are talking about a concept here!

    And in your mind that concept is that it is okay for someone to pay a premium for a device that ends up not having features and capabilities that are standard for that price range and class of device, and then he has to fiddle with the device and third party apps to “hone” it, as you put it? You’ve got to re-think your concept.

    While you think a document editor is essential (being a Blogger, Preacher – among other things) on an upscale phone, I think a capable file explorer (e.g LonelyCatGames Xplorer ) is more essential on a high-faltutin device.

    It is not either or. You just are not getting it. It isn’t what we think. Its what the industry has established. A capable file browser has come to be accepted as standard on a high-end smartphone too 🙂

    I will reiterate. For the LAST time.

    You have no idea how glad we are to read this. The illogicalities you have reiterated so far are things we can do without.

    And do not be so quick to negatively judge obduracy of opinion. Nothing is right and nothing is wrong. It all depends on your perception of things.

    Cough! Gag!! Sputter! Wheez!! Nothing is right and nothing is wrong? Please keep your philosophy to yourself.

    Some opinions are not worth the paper on which they are written and they should be discarded outrightly. Some of your opinions so far – including both your concept of highend smartphones and the absurd idea that nothing is right and nothing is wrong – qualify.

    I shall pursue this NO further since our positions seem set in concrete.

    We believe that some things are wrong, and some things are right – and you do too, but you won’t admit it because you are too stubborn and proud to back down from a lame position. If you truly believe that nonsense, for example, you wouldn’t complain about ISPs not delivering reliable services as you have done regularly on this site.

    But thanks for doing us all a favour and pursuing this no further. No hard feelings from us, but hey – nothing is right and nothing is wrong, afterall 🙂

  • February 9, 2010 at 8:57 pm
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    Hmmm…… Nice philosophy.

    Motorola should make Droids with 176*220 pixel screen, no wifi, no bluetooth, and no GPS? After all, i just want to make calls and show off with the phone. And of course, my nokia 2700 should come with multitasking because i love playing music, surfing the web, and making occasional calls simultaneously. …..

    NOTHING IS RIGHT AND NOTHING IS WRONG…..

    All said, it has been a very nice and enlightening discussion and i must say, i have really learnt a lot from both sides of the argument. EyeBeeKay may be wide off the mark but he made many points worth thinking about.

    At the end of the day, we all expect to get what we pay for, and premium phones makers should not lose sight of that.

  • February 9, 2010 at 9:19 pm
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    EyeBeeKay may be wide off the mark but he made many points worth thinking about.

    True.

    At the end of the day, we all expect to get what we pay for, and premium phones makers should not lose sight of that.

    That, sir, is a philosophy that makes sense. It has been good discussing this.

Comments are closed.

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